17 fevereiro 2018

LL Ori and the Orion Nebula


Stars can make waves in the Orion Nebula's sea of gas and dust. This esthetic close-up of cosmic clouds and stellar winds features LL Orionis, interacting with the Orion Nebula flow. Adrift in Orion's stellar nursery and still in its formative years, variable star LL Orionis produces a wind more energetic than the wind from our own middle-aged Sun. As the fast stellar wind runs into slow moving gas a shock front is formed, analogous to the bow wave of a boat moving through water or a plane traveling at supersonic speed. The small, arcing, graceful structure just above and left of center is LL Ori's cosmic bow shock, measuring about half a light-year across. The slower gas is flowing away from the Orion Nebula's hot central star cluster, the Trapezium, located off the upper left corner of the picture. In three dimensions, LL Ori's wrap-around shock front is shaped like a bowl that appears brightest when viewed along the "bottom" edge. This beautiful painting-like photograph is part of a large mosaic view of the complex stellar nursery in Orion, filled with a myriad of fluid shapes associated with star formation.

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The United Nations passed the “Convention on the Law of the Sea” in 1994 and is now the...

The United Nations passed the “Convention on the Law of the Sea” in 1994 and is now the recognized governing body in all legal matters concerning the world’s oceans.

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http://ift.tt/2flgK2S this cartoon by Jeff Wysaski...



www.all-about-psychology.com

Love this cartoon by Jeff Wysaski over at pleated-jeans.com

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Horrific Aztec Plague Identified Using Modern DNA Analyses

DNA analyses from a mass grave, dating to the end of the Aztec Empire, shows they died of an epidemic of salmonella. Salmonella enterica Paratyphi C, a pathogen that causes enteric fever, is the likely culprit. This is the first time science has been used to identify the epidemic which the Spanish at the time called “full bloodiness.” Its indigenous name was the cocoliztli epidemic.

The epidemic hit regions of Mexico and Guatemala from 1545-1550, and symptoms included intense fever, pain, vomiting and bleeding from eyes and nose. The death toll is estimated to be between 5 and 15 million Native Americans – that’s up to 80% of a population which had no resistance to this, or a host of other diseases, which had suddenly arrived on their continent.

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