29 janeiro 2015

ON THIS DAY IN THE HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (30th January...





ON THIS DAY IN THE HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (30th January 1863)


Joseph Jastrow was born.


GO HERE —> http://ift.tt/1eWNk1f for free psychology information & resources.


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Close Encounter with M44



On Monday, January 26, well-tracked asteroid 2004 BL86 made its closest approach, a mere 1.2 million kilometers from our fair planet. That's about 3.1 times the Earth-Moon distance or 4 light-seconds away. Moving quickly through Earth's night sky, it left this streak in a 40 minute long exposure on January 27 made from Piemonte, Italy. The remarkably pretty telescopic field of view includes M44, also known as the Beehive or Praesepe star cluster in Cancer. Of course, its close encounter with M44 is only an apparent one, with the cluster nearly along the same line-of-sight to the near-earth asteroid. The actual distance between star cluster and asteroid is around 600 light-years. Still, the close approach to planet Earth allowed detailed radar imaging from NASA's Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, California and revealed the asteroid to have its own moon.



from NASA http://ift.tt/1uDIdf4

via IFTTT
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Brain Foodssource













Brain Foods


source


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Seeing is not remembering People may have to “turn...





Seeing is not remembering


People may have to “turn on” their memories in order to remember even the simplest details of an experience, according to Penn State psychologists. This finding, which has been named “attribute amnesia,” indicates that memory is far more selective than previously thought.


"It is commonly believed that you will remember specific details about the things you’re attending to, but our experiments show that this is not necessarily true," said Brad Wyble, assistant professor of psychology. "We found that in some cases, people have trouble remembering even very simple pieces of information when they do not expect to have to remember them."


Wyble and Hui Chen, postdoctoral fellow in psychology, tested the memories of 100 undergraduate students, divided into several groups. Each group performed a variation of the experiment in order to replicate the results for different kinds of information, such as numbers, letters or colors.


In each trial participants were shown four characters on a screen arranged in a square — for example three numbers and one letter — and were told that they would need to report which corner the letter was in. After a set amount of time, the characters disappeared from the screen and the participants reported where they remembered the letter had been. This part of the task was expected to be easy — participants rarely made an error.


After repeating this simple task numerous times, the participant was asked an unexpected question in order to probe the memory for the very information used to find the letter’s location. Four letters appeared on the screen and the participant was asked to identify which one had appeared on the previous screen. Only 25 percent of the participants identified the correct letter — the same percentage as would be expected to randomly guess it.


Similar results were obtained when participants were asked to locate odd numbers, even numbers and colors.


"This result is surprising because traditional theories of attention assume that when a specific piece of information is attended, that information is also stored in memory and therefore participants should have done better on the surprise memory test," said Wyble.


Chen and Wyble have called the phenomenon they observed attribute amnesia, as they reported in an article recently published online in the journal Psychological Science. Attribute amnesia occurs when a person uses a piece of information to perform a task, but is then unable to report specifically what that information was as little as one second later.


"The information we asked them about in the surprise question was important, because we had just asked them to use it," said Chen. "It was not irrelevant to the task they were given."


After the surprise trial, the same question was repeated on the next trial, however it was no longer a surprise. Participants did dramatically better with the average of correct answers between 65 and 95 percent across the different experiments.


The researchers point out that this result suggests that people’s expectations play an important role in determining what they remember, even for information they are specifically using.


"It seems like memory is sort of like a camcorder," said Wyble. "If you don’t hit the ‘record’ button on the camcorder, it’s not going to ‘remember’ what the lens is pointed at. But if you do hit the ‘record’ button — in this case, you know what you’re going to be asked to remember — then the information is stored."


Wyble and Chen argue that this selective memory storage might be a useful adaptation because it prevents the brain from remembering information that is probably not important. The researchers plan to continue this line of research as they study whether people are aware of their own lack of memory.


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Source for more facts follow NowYouKno





Source for more facts follow NowYouKno


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Here’s how much the U.S. spends on prison vs. education, in one...






Here’s how much the U.S. spends on prison vs. education, in one startling GIF



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"Do not train a child to learn by force or harshness; but direct them to it by what amuses their..."

“Do not train a child to learn by force or harshness; but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.”



- Plato
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Source for more facts follow NowYouKno





Source for more facts follow NowYouKno


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interesting-linkz:swoilli: interesting-linkz: What Kind of...





interesting-linkz:



swoilli:



interesting-linkz:





literally me the rest of the night, just clicking every link like




More links for later/future reference! Compiled everything for everyone




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Source for more facts follow NowYouKno





Source for more facts follow NowYouKno


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Creepypasta: A face da morte

Tudo começou em 2011, quando um homem chamado Jorden Defrans encontrou uma foto dentro de um álbum num armário que pertencia ao seu pai. Ele ficou sem saber como é que a foto estava no álbum dos seus pais. Então, ele usou a tecnologia actual e fez um zoom na fotografia misteriosa. Chocado ao encontrar esta imagem, Jorden começou a ter alucinações perturbadoras que, supostamente, serviram para ilustrar o terrível destino daquela pobre alma da foto.

Em 2012, Jorden Defrans teve um grave acidente vascular cerebral enquanto estava a caminho da casa do seu irmão. Ninguém sabe como é que ele foi vítima de um AVC, mas julga-se que terá sido um efeito daquela imagem maldita. Os principais investigadores do caso examinaram-na e fizeram zoom, mas não conseguiram identificar o rosto. O seu irmão, Zane Defrans e sua esposa Mary viram o rosto no computador que mostrava os dois irmãos mortos, mas semanas depois, quando os investigadores pretenderam vê-lo, ele tinha desaparecido.

Hoje em dia, as pessoas dizem que a face era de um demónio e que desapareceu quando Jorden morreu. Então, se alguém ver a face da morte, terá uma morte inexplicada.



The Demon Yell

Adaptado de: creepypastapuro



via @notiun


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(From Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance)

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From: 70 Classic Aphorisms And Maxims All Psychology Students...





From: 70 Classic Aphorisms And Maxims All Psychology Students Should Know. (http://ift.tt/1BhKkKl)


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