16 fevereiro 2015

ON THIS DAY IN THE HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (17th February 1890)Sir...





ON THIS DAY IN THE HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (17th February 1890)


Sir Ronald Fisher was born.


GO HERE —> http://ift.tt/1eWNk1f For Free Psychology Information & Resources.


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M106: A Spiral Galaxy with a Strange Center



What's happening at the center of spiral galaxy M106? A swirling disk of stars and gas, M106's appearance is dominated by blue spiral arms and red dust lanes near the nucleus, as shown in the featured image. The core of M106 glows brightly in radio waves and X-rays where twin jets have been found running the length of the galaxy. An unusual central glow makes M106 one of the closest examples of the Seyfert class of galaxies, where vast amounts of glowing gas are thought to be falling into a central massive black hole. M106, also designated NGC 4258, is a relatively close 23.5 million light years away, spans 60 thousand light years across, and can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici).



from NASA http://ift.tt/17fSLLF

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What happens when you drink a cup of coffee Coffee is fantastic...





































What happens when you drink a cup of coffee


Coffee is fantastic - there’s no denying that. In fact, it is the world’s most popular beverage after water. But do you ever wonder why exactly coffee makes you feel so good? Here’s a timeline to show you what happens, in scientific terms, when you drink a cup of coffee.


Infographic by Map Coffee


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"You can teach a student a lesson for a day; but if you can teach him to learn by creating curiosity,..."

“"You can teach a student a lesson for a day; but if you can teach him to learn by creating curiosity, he will continue the learning process as long as he lives."”



- Clay P. Bedford (via neuromorphogenesis)
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sixpenceee:Skull of a woman with monocephalus diprosopus. This...





sixpenceee:



Skull of a woman with monocephalus diprosopus. This is a form of conjoined twinning characterized by a single head and two faces. From the Museum of Anatomy in Montpellier, France.



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Queen Margaret the Great of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden was a pretty amazing ruler. She lived from...

Queen Margaret the Great of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden was a pretty amazing ruler. She lived from 1353 to 1412 not a period in European history known for its liberality towards women. And yet she founded and ruled the Kalmar Union, which united the Scandinavian countries for over a century. Want to find out more about this remarkable person? Check out my latest post at historical-nonfiction.com


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If you're just going to regurgitate what was fed to you without looking into other sources, you're ignorant and should unfollow me immediately. I source every post, to those who try to discredit the information on here. If you have a source, send it over. If not, stop rambling like little children

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Mustard Gas Might Not Be All Bad

Modern chemotherapy treatment for cancer came about as a direct result from mustard gas testing by the US Army during World War II. They were looking for both chemical weapons and ways to protect against chemical weapons the enemy might have developed. The compound called nitrogen mustard was studied and found to work against a cancer of the lymph nodes, which paved the way to studying similar but more effective agents (called alkylating agents) that killed rapidly growing cancer cells by damaging their DNA.. And the chemotherapy treatment was born.


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Train A Chipmunk

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Anthesteria: the Ancient Greek Equivalent of a Music Festival

A three-day festival held in all the Ionian Greek cities, in the spring. Because Athenians liked to write things down on random items like pottery, we know the most about how Athens celebrated Anthesteria. On the first day, it was known as “Pithoigia” which means “the opening of the jars.” That’s when everyone would get to taste, for the first time, the wine that had fermented over the winter. Kids would often be put on swings, evoking the myth of how Dionysus first gave wine to man. That is all I will say on that subject, because the full story is pretty macabre.


The second day was known as “Choes.” This was the day that everyone went crazy. People dressed up and imitated the mythical followers of Dionysus, like naenads and satyrs. This was one of the only times that Greeks would drink unmixed wine. Normally, there were very strict rules about how you watered down wine. So as you can imagine, the Greeks would get pretty fucked up. It was a festival designed to evoke a more primitive time, and it was believed the souls of the dead came out to walk — and party — with the living. Social hierarchies were turned on their head - men would chase after women and women could (gasp) refuse them!


The third day was “Chytroi” which roughly translates to “feast of the pots.” A pot of gruel or lentils would be sacrified to Dionysus. It was the day the Greeks would go back in time — before animal sacrifice, before gods, and before wine. This was the day everyone was really hungover, and since they did not drink, it was probably pretty bad.


source:Greek Religion by Walter Burkert


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February 16th 1959: Fidel Castro becomes Prime MinisterOn this...



Fidel Castro (b. 1926)





Fulgencio Batista (1901 - 1973)





Castro with Che Guevara





The American reconnaissance photo which proved Soviet missiles were being placed in Cuba



February 16th 1959: Fidel Castro becomes Prime Minister


On this day in 1959, Fidel Castro was sworn in as Prime Minister of Cuba. Born to a wealthy Cuban family in 1926, Castro attended university in Havana. In 1952 he witnessed the overthrow of the government by the forces of General Batista, leading Castro to call for full-scale revolution. After serving some time in prison for an attempted uprising against the dictatorial Batista, Castro fled to Mexico where he met Argentinian revolutionary Che Guevara. In 1956, Castro and Guevara began a guerrilla war against the U.S.-backed government, which was ultimately successful and caused Batista to flee in early 1959. Upon becoming Prime Minister, Castro inaugurated a Marxist-Leninist plan for Cuba, which caused some conservative Cubans to emigrate to the United States. Though initially trying to establish normalised relations with the United States - which included Castro meeting with Vice President Richard Nixon in April 1959 - tensions soon escalated between the two nations. In 1960 the U.S. imposed economic sanctions on Cuba, and in 1961 the disastrous Bay of Pigs invasion occurred, in which CIA-sponsored Cuban exiles launched an unsuccessful invasion of Cuba. The U.S. distrusted Castro’s communist leanings and feared an alliance between Cuba and the Soviet Union - America’s Cold War rival. This fear appeared well founded, as in 1962 the U.S. discovered that Castro had secretly allowed the Soviets to plant missiles in Cuba. This led to the Cuban Missile Crisis, where tensions over the missiles escalated to a point where many thought nuclear war was imminent. Castro became President in 1976, though his leadership was controversial, for while he ruled dictatorially and repressively, he was generally popular among Cubans for his education and healthcare programmes. Castro stood down in 2008, and was succeeded by his brother Raúl. This January saw a momentous normalisation of U.S.-Cuba relations, ending a fifty year trade embargo and establishing diplomatic relations.


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Smoking’s Death Toll May Be Higher Than Anyone Knew By...





Smoking’s Death Toll May Be Higher Than Anyone Knew


By Richard Harris


The U.S. surgeon general lists 21 deadly diseases that are caused by smoking. Now, a study in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine points to more than a dozen other diseases that apparently add to the tobacco death toll.


To arrive at this conclusion, scientists from the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute and several universities tracked nearly a million people for a decade and recorded their causes of death.


As expected, the researchers found that smokers were much more likely to die of lung cancer, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, esophageal cancer, mouth cancer and a long list of other diseases that health officials have previously linked to smoking.


But author Eric Jacobs, strategic director of pharmacoepidemiology at the American Cancer Society, found other causes of death that were also more common in smokers — “things like kidney failure, infections and certain types of heart and respiratory diseases that weren’t previously counted,” he says.


(More on Shots - Health News from NPR)


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