26 novembro 2016

Astrologia Chinesa – 2017 é ano do Galo vermelho de fogo!



Estamos preparando mais um artigo sobre o ano de 2017 que está chegando aí. Vamos falar do horóscopo Chinês, o que será que podemos esperar da Astrologia Oriental?

O ano do Galo Vermelho de Fogo!

Não perca! 
Read More

East to West, Light and Shadow


On this November morning an old crescent Moon and morning star rise just before the Sun in a wide panoramic skyscape from Kenya's Amboseli National Park. Still below the limbs of an acacia tree and the eastern horizon, the Sun's position is easy to find though. It's marked at the left by the subtle convergence of light and shadow in the dawn sky. Known as crepuscular rays, the warm-colored rays of sunlight are outlined by shadows cast by unseen clouds near the horizon. Arcing above the profile of Mount Kilimanjaro, toward the right the rays of light and shadow converge at the western horizon. There known as anti-crepuscular rays, they indicate the point opposite the rising sun. The cloud shadows are very nearly parallel, but converge toward the distant horizons because of perspective.

from NASA http://ift.tt/2gwPjCY
via IFTTT
Read More

The territory of the dynasties of China



The territory of the dynasties of China

Read More

the Suffix -Stan Explained



the Suffix -Stan Explained

Read More

TODAY IN THE HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGYVisit –>...



TODAY IN THE HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

Visit –> all-about-psychology.com for free psychology information and resources.

Read More

New role of adenosine in the regulation of REM sleep discovered

neurosciencestuff:

The regulation and function of sleep is one of the biggest black boxes of today’s brain science. A new paper published online on August 2 in the journal Brain Structure & Function finds that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is suppressed by adenosine acting on a specific subtype of adenosine receptors, the A2A receptors, in the olfactory bulb. The study was conducted by researchers at Fudan University’s School of Basic Medical Sciences in the Department of Pharmacology and the University of Tsukuba’s International Institute for Integrative Sleep Medicine (WPI-IIIS). The research team used pharmacological and genetic methods to show that blocking A2A receptors or neurons that contain the A2A receptors in the olfactory bulb increases REM sleep in rodents.

Adenosine has long been known to represent a state of relative energy deficiency and to induce sleep by blocking wakefulness. The new findings demonstrate for the first time that adenosine also inhibits REM sleep, a unique phase of sleep in mammalians that is characterized by random eye movement and low muscle tone throughout the body. The Chinese-Japanese research team discovered that adenosine acts specifically in the olfactory bulb which transmits odor information from the nose to the brain. Because olfactory dysfunction can be treated with an A2A receptor antagonist, for example caffeine, it is possible that REM sleep and the perception of odors are linked in the olfactory bulb. Interestingly, the ability to smell is reduced in patients with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Dreams which mostly occur during REM sleep are usually a pure mental activity while the body is at rest. However, patients who suffer from RBD act out their dreams.

Yiqun Wang, the lead investigator on this project said that “our findings encourage us to believe that A2A receptors may be a novel target to treat RBD by suppressing REM sleep. Our observation clearly suggest an intriguing possibility for treating this disease with an A2A receptor agonist or allosteric modulator.”

Read More