19 outubro 2014

thinksquad: If you take to Twitter to express your views on a...









thinksquad:



If you take to Twitter to express your views on a hot-button issue, does the government have an interest in deciding whether you are spreading “misinformation’’? If you tweet your support for a candidate in the November elections, should taxpayer money be used to monitor your speech and evaluate your “partisanship’’?


My guess is that most Americans would answer those questions with a resounding no. But the federal government seems to disagree. The National Science Foundation , a federal agency whose mission is to “promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity and welfare; and to secure the national defense,” is funding a project to collect and analyze your Twitter data.


The project is being developed by researchers at Indiana University, and its purported aim is to detect what they deem “social pollution” and to study what they call “social epidemics,” including how memes — ideas that spread throughout pop culture — propagate. What types of social pollution are they targeting? “Political smears,” so-called “astroturfing” and other forms of “misinformation.”


Named “Truthy,” after a term coined by TV host Stephen Colbert, the project claims to use a “sophisticated combination of text and data mining, social network analysis, and complex network models” to distinguish between memes that arise in an “organic manner” and those that are manipulated into being.


But there’s much more to the story. Focusing in particular on political speech, Truthy keeps track of which Twitter accounts are using hashtags such as #teaparty and #dems. It estimates users’ “partisanship.” It invites feedback on whether specific Twitter users, such as the Drudge Report, are “truthy” or “spamming.” And it evaluates whether accounts are expressing “positive” or “negative” sentiments toward other users or memes.


http://ift.tt/1uiY81a



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Comet McNaught Over New Zealand



Comet McNaught was perhaps the most photogenic comet of modern times -- from Earth. After making quite a show in the northern hemisphere in early January of 2007, the comet moved south and developed a long and unusual dust tail that dazzled southern hemisphere observers. In late January 2007, Comet McNaught was captured between Mount Remarkable and Cecil Peak in this spectacular image taken from Queenstown, South Island, New Zealand. The bright comet dominates the right part of the above image, while the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy dominates the left. Careful inspection of the image will reveal a meteor streak just to the left of the comet. Today, Comet Siding Spring may become the most photogenic comet of modern times -- from Mars.



from NASA http://ift.tt/1ohO7Fd

via IFTTT
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whyshoulddothing: Why you should follow movie.tumblr.com Because Arnold gives good advice Because...

whyshoulddothing: Why you should follow movie.tumblr.com Because Arnold gives good advice Because...
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"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all,..."

“Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained.”



- Marie Curie
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October 19th 1781: Cornwallis surrenders On this day in 1781 in...



Surrender of Lord Cornwallis by John Trumbull 1820





Lord Cornwallis (1738-1805) by John Singleton Copley 1795





George Washington (1732-1799) by Gilbert Stuart 1797



October 19th 1781: Cornwallis surrenders


On this day in 1781 in Yorktown, Virginia, during the American Revolutionary War, British commander Cornwallis formally surrendered to George Washington. Thus, the Siege of Yorktown was a decisive victory for the American forces and their French allies, and was the last major battle of the war. Cornwallis’s surrender led to the opening of peace negotiations and the Treaty of Paris was reached in 1783, which ended the war between Britain and the United States and preserved American independence.


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Source for more facts follow NowYouKno





Source for more facts follow NowYouKno


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"History …[is] where everything unexpected in its own time is chronicled on the page as..."

“History …[is] where everything unexpected in its own time is chronicled on the page as inevitable. … The terror of the unforeseen is what the science of history hides, turning a disaster into an epic.”



- Philip Roth, The Plot Against America (2004)
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If you like psychology, you’ll love...





If you like psychology, you’ll love http://ift.tt/1eWNk1f


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Acting Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak discusses...





Acting Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak discusses the Tobacco-Free College Campus Initiative, and welcomes you and your campus to lead by example in the fight against tobacco!


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1 quick question if you have 1 second! What's your favorite movie quote that you'll ALWAYS reblog when you see it?

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SHOW OFF YOUR INNER NERD THIS HALLOWEEN. CLICK HERE —>...





SHOW OFF YOUR INNER NERD THIS HALLOWEEN.

CLICK HERE —> http://ift.tt/1pclYdo To get your limited-edition paranormal distribution t-shirt.

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shrinemaidens: EAST ASIAN MYTHOLOGY MEME: [3/9] CHINESE GODS...









shrinemaidens:



EAST ASIAN MYTHOLOGY MEME:



[3/9] CHINESE GODS AND GODDESSES | XIHE


Xihe or Hsi-ho [羲和] was a sun goddess in Chinese mythology.


One of the two wives of Emperor Jun (along with Changxi), she was the “mother” of ten suns, in the form of three-legged birds. They resided in a mulberry tree in the eastern Fusang sea.


Each day Xihe bathed one of her children in the river; one would fly up into the sky and be the Sun for each day. Folklore also held that (around 2170 BC) all ten sun birds came out on the same day, causing the world to burn; Houyi the archer saved the day by shooting down all but one of the sun birds.




mythos
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in-somniar: Mythology Meme [4/∞]: The legend of Medea Medea...

















in-somniar:



Mythology Meme [4/∞]: The legend of Medea



Medea was the daughter of King Aeëtes of Colchis and a decendent of Helios. She is also the husband of Janos, who took her from Colchis to a foreign country, where they married and had children. The legend goes that, when Janos set aside Medea in favour of another, she was filled with such rage that she poisoned his bride and killed their children - for though the pain inflicted upon herself was far greater than what Janos felt, it was the best way to hurt him as he had hurt her.




mythos
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Why do you study psychology? The greatest answer ever! If you...





Why do you study psychology? The greatest answer ever!


If you like psychology, you’ll love http://ift.tt/1eWNk1f


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gov-info: HHS NIH Gov Doc: Hispanic Community Health Study...





gov-info:



HHS NIH Gov Doc: Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of Latinos (SOL)


The Hispanic Community Health Study is a comprehensive health and lifestyle analysis of people from a range of Hispanic/Latino origins shows that this segment of the U.S. population is diverse, not only in ancestry, culture, and economic status, but also in the prevalence of several diseases, risk factors, and lifestyle habits.


These health data are derived from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), led by the NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a landmark study that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults living in San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins. These new findings have been compiled and published as the Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities. The full report is available in English and Spanish.



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The flag of Mozambique — yes, that’s an AK-47





The flag of Mozambique — yes, that’s an AK-47


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On This Day in the History of Psychology (19th October...





On This Day in the History of Psychology (19th October 1891)


Lois Meek Stolz was born.


GO HERE —> http://ift.tt/1eWNk1f for free psychology information & resources.


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