26 fevereiro 2015

Love and War by Moonlight



Venus, named for the Roman goddess of love, and Mars, the war god's namesake, came together by moonlight in this lovely skyview, recorded on February 20 from Charleston, South Carolina, USA, planet Earth. Made in twilight with a digital camera, the three second time exposure also records earthshine illuminating the otherwise dark surface of the young crescent Moon. Of course, the Moon has moved on from this much anticipated triple conjunction. Venus still shines in the west though as the evening star, third brightest object in Earth's sky, after the Sun and the Moon itself. Seen here within almost a Moon's width of Venus, much fainter Mars approached even closer on the following evening. But Mars has since been moving slowly away from brilliant Venus, though Mars is still visible too in the western twilight.



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rubyfruitjumble:luzazuldelaluna:mathematics-and-butterflies: Hi...





















rubyfruitjumble:



luzazuldelaluna:



mathematics-and-butterflies:



Hi guys! I found this app the other day and I wanted to share it with you. It’s called ‘Forest: Stay focused’ and it really helps me whilst studying.



for yall who need to study



I feel like this will work for me because it’s like punishing yourself in a way that doesn’t really matter lol



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This picture, circa 1860, is the oldest surviving aerial photo...





This picture, circa 1860, is the oldest surviving aerial photo in the world. It is an image of Boston, taken from a hot air balloon, and originally titled “Boston, as the Eagle and the Wild Goose See It.”


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Source for more facts follow NowYouKno Other Banksy paintings in...

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Feb. 26, 1966 Launch of Apollo-Saturn 201



Apollo-Saturn 201 (AS-201), the first Saturn IB launch vehicle developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), lifts off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 11:12 a.m. on Feb. 26, 1966. The AS-201 mission was an unmanned suborbital flight to test the Saturn 1B launch vehicle and the Apollo Command and Service Modules. This was the first flight of the S-IB and S-IVB stages, including the first flight test of the liquid-hydrogen/liquid oxygen-propelled J-2 engine in the S-IVB stage. During the thirty-seven minute flight, the vehicle reached an altitude of 303 miles and traveled 5,264 miles downrange. Image Credit: NASA



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What's your strory, señor?

Sorry this is such a late reply! I think you’re asking who I am, so first off I’ll say that it’s actually señorita! I’m a 21 year old undergraduate History student at the University of Sheffield in the UK, and the focus of my studies is American history. I started this blog around three years ago because I love history, and I especially enjoy trying to make it accessible to a wide audience of people. If I could make a career out of this then I wouldn’t say no! My ideal job is something in the public history line of work, so for example museums, documentaries, etc. But really I’m pretty much just your average student, and as much as I love my degree most of the time I’d rather be going on a night out or staying in bed watching Netflix! Guess that’s pretty much my story, thanks for asking!


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Gaetano Donizetti (1797-1848) wrote one of opera’s most famous...





Gaetano Donizetti (1797-1848) wrote one of opera’s most famous insanity scenes in Lucia di Lammermoor (1835), based on Sir Walter Scott’s novel The Bride of Lammermoor. Donizetti himself later went mad due to syphilis and spent the last years of his life in an insane asylum.


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February 26th 1936: Attempted coup in JapanOn this day in 1936,...



Third regiment of the rebels march to their barracks during the coup





Rebel-occupied Sanno Hotel in 1936





Martial law headquarters in Tokyo during the incident



February 26th 1936: Attempted coup in Japan


On this day in 1936, the so-called ‘February 26 Incident’ occurred in Japan. The incident was an attempted coup d’etat in which some Japanese troops took over the capital of Tokyo to express anger at the government. They criticised the government’s supposedly passive foreign policy and lack of respect for the Emperor. It was led by a group of young army radicals, who mustered the support of over one thousand troops in their attack on government buildings in Tokyo. Among the victims of the attempted coup were the Home and Finance ministers, and the rebels were able to hold the Tokyo Police Department building. However the rebels failed to seize the Imperial Palace or assassinate the Prime Minister. Therefore, while the rebellious soldiers had some initial success, their coup was promptly suppressed by February 29th. After the Emperor declared that he did not support their actions, the army was sent to destroy the rebel forces, with martial law being declared in Tokyo. The instigators of the incident were severely punished by the authorities, with nineteen executed and forty imprisoned, alongside a wider military purge of dissident elements.


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(From The Guttmacher Institute)

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