17 abril 2015

frostysparrow: ayellowbirds:xolroc:wolfnanaki:nowyoukno:Source...

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M46 Plus Two



Galactic or open star clusters are young. These swarms of stars are born together near the plane of the Milky Way, but their numbers steadily dwindle as cluster members are ejected by galactic tides and gravitational interactions. In fact, this bright open cluster, known as M46, is around 300 million years young. It still contains a few hundred stars within a span of 30 light-years or so. Located about 5,000 light-years away toward the constellation Puppis, M46 also seems to contain contradictions to its youthful status. In this pretty starscape, the colorful, circular patch above and right of the center of M46 is the planetary nebula NGC 2438. Fainter still, a second planetary nebula, PK231+4.1, is identified by the box at the right and enlarged in the inset. Planetary nebulae are a brief, final phase in the life of a sun-like star a billion years old or more, whose central reservoir of hydrogen fuel has been exhausted. NGC 2438 is estimated to be only 3,000 light-years distant, though, and moves at a different speed than M46 cluster members. Along with its fainter cohort, planetary nebula NGC 2438 is likely only by chance appearing near our line-of-sight to the young stars of M46.



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chromaticwasp: mingesu: gengxiaoshao: step-n-wolf: whyeven131...

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Celebs That Made Holocaust-related Blunders

Celebs That Made Holocaust-related Blunders:...
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White Dwarf May Have Shredded Passing Planet



In this Chandra image of ngc6388, researchers have found evidence that a white dwarf star may have ripped apart a planet as it came too close. When a star reaches its white dwarf stage, nearly all of the material from the star is packed inside a radius one hundredth that of the original star. The destruction of a planet may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but a team of astronomers has found evidence that this may have happened in an ancient cluster of stars at the edge of the Milky Way galaxy. Using several telescopes, including NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, researchers have found evidence that a white dwarf star – the dense core of a star like the Sun that has run out of nuclear fuel – may have ripped apart a planet as it came too close. More information. Image Credit: NASA



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nowyoukno: Source for more facts follow NowYouKno





nowyoukno:



Source for more facts follow NowYouKno



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jaxblade: gavinplebfree: xviqueenkayy: blazian-deity96: foobi...

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Source for more facts follow NowYouKno





Source for more facts follow NowYouKno


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Never Trust Food Again! Dangerous Food Additives the FDA Considers "Safe"

Never Trust Food Again! Dangerous Food Additives the FDA Considers "Safe":...
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climateadaptation: NASA has a pretty good website describing...





climateadaptation:



NASA has a pretty good website describing climate change . This graphic shows the rise of CO2 in the earth’s atmosphere over 650,000 years. There are natural variations and cycles, which has caused climate to change over time. Those peaks and dips correspond with hot, normal, and cool periods over thousands of years, for example. But never before has there been an event like the one we are causing today. This spike in CO2 and other emissions has never happened in earth’s history.


Longtime followers know that - based on the evidence (i.e., first line, page 4) - it’s nearly impossible to stop or reverse this rise. So, I suppose, NASA’s page is a real-time recording of impending doom.



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the sun, photographed by sdo, 16th april 2015.24 images over 6...









the sun, photographed by sdo, 16th april 2015.


24 images over 6 hours. images inverted and colour applied in post.


image credit: nasa/sdo, aia/eve/hmi. animation: ageofdestruction.


age
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April 17th 1964: Ford Mustang debutsOn this day in 1964, the...



1964 Ford Mustang (source: http://ift.tt/1OPLd3k)





2015 Ford Mustang 50th Anniversary Edition (source: http://ift.tt/1l5MEvb)



April 17th 1964: Ford Mustang debuts


On this day in 1964, the Ford Motor Company introduced their new sports car - the Ford Mustang - to the public. The Mustang was one of the first ‘pony cars’, which are smaller sports car-like coupes. The car had debuted two years earlier at the United States Grand Prix, but Ford introduced their new car to the public at the New York World’s Fair in 1964. Ford received over 22,000 orders from around the world on the first day, and the car’s popularity only increased from there. The model’s fame was cemented when a Mustang appeared in the James Bond film ‘Goldfinger’ in September 1964. The Mustang is now approaching its sixth generation, and has changed a lot since the 1964 version. Last year marked the 50th anniversary of this legendary American car, and Ford celebrated with a limited edition 50th anniversary 2015 Mustang GT.


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Pogo Stick ... Physics?

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Source for more facts follow NowYouKno





Source for more facts follow NowYouKno


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Se um problema não tem solução... Dalai Lama do budismo tibetano

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Statue of Aztec goddess Coatlicue, whose name means “[she who...





Statue of Aztec goddess Coatlicue, whose name means “[she who has] the skirt of snakes.”


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Source for more facts follow NowYouKno





Source for more facts follow NowYouKno


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Dementia ‘halted in mice brains’ The team at Duke...





Dementia ‘halted in mice brains’


The team at Duke University, in the US, showed immune cells which start attacking nutrients in the brain may be a trigger for the disease.


They say their findings could open up new avenues of research for a field that has not developed a single drug to slow the progression of the disease.


Experts said the findings offered new hope of a treatment.


The researchers indentified microglia - normally the first line of defence against infection in the brain - as major players in the development of dementia.


They found some microglia changed to become exceptionally adept at breaking down a component of protein, an amino acid called arginine, in the early stages of the disease.


As arginine levels plummeted, the immune cells appeared to dampened the immune system in the brain.


Stopping dementia


In mouse experiments, a chemical was used to block the enzymes that break down arginine.


They showed fewer of the characteristics of dementia such as damaged proteins collecting in the brain and the animals performed better in memory tests.


One of the researchers, Dr Matthew Kan, said: “All of this suggests to us that if you can block this local process of amino acid deprivation, then you can protect the mouse, at least from Alzheimer’s disease.


"We see this study opening the doors to thinking about Alzheimer’s in a completely different way, to break the stalemate of ideas in Alzheimer’s disease.”


However, the findings do not suggest that arginine supplements could combat dementia as the boosted levels would still be broken down.


'Hope’


Dr James Pickett, from the Alzheimer’s Society said the study was “offering hope that these findings could lead to new treatments for dementia”.


He added: “This study in animals joins some of the dots in our incomplete understanding of the processes that cause Alzheimer’s disease, in particular around the role played by the immune system.”


Dr Laura Phipps, from Alzheimer’s Research UK, said the study was “interesting” and shed “more light on the mechanisms of immune system involvement in Alzheimer’s”.


But she cautioned clinical trials in people were still needed and that “the findings do not suggest that supplementation of the amino acid could mirror the benefits seen in these mice”.


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Celebs That Made Holocaust-related Blunders

Celebs That Made Holocaust-related Blunders:...
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Never Trust Food Again! Dangerous Food Additives the FDA Considers "Safe"

Never Trust Food Again! Dangerous Food Additives the FDA Considers "Safe":...
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nodaybuttodaytodefygravity: nowyoukno: Source for more facts...

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chromaticwasp: mingesu: gengxiaoshao: step-n-wolf: whyeven131...

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The Richest Women in the World

The Richest Women in the World:...
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Health Benefits of Meditation

Health Benefits of Meditation: itsmeagan: bez0: jimmij93: everyone should see these health hacks!...
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urbanurkel: prettyboyshyflizzy: nakedintellect: shutupshonna: ...

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Love this quote by author Guy P. Harrison.Visit...





Love this quote by author Guy P. Harrison.


Visit http://ift.tt/1eWNk1f for free & comprehensive psychology information and resources.


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todaysdocument: Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17,...





todaysdocument:



Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790)


Founding father, author, printer, postmaster, inventor, statesman, and diplomat Benjamin Franklin died on this day 1790 at age 84.



Franklin, Benjamin (bust) from the series Photographs of Portraits of Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1935 - 1939




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White Dwarf May Have Shredded Passing Planet



In this Chandra image of ngc6388, researchers have found evidence that a white dwarf star may have ripped apart a planet as it came too close. When a star reaches its white dwarf stage, nearly all of the material from the star is packed inside a radius one hundredth that of the original star. The destruction of a planet may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but a team of astronomers has found evidence that this may have happened in an ancient cluster of stars at the edge of the Milky Way galaxy. Using several telescopes, including NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, researchers have found evidence that a white dwarf star – the dense core of a star like the Sun that has run out of nuclear fuel – may have ripped apart a planet as it came too close. More information. Image Credit: NASA



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A Welsh community was established in Argentina 150 years ago. Today about 5,000 Argentines speak...

A Welsh community was established in Argentina 150 years ago. Today about 5,000 Argentines speak Welsh as a native language.


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ucsdhealthsciences: Smokers Who Use E-Cigarettes Less Likely to...





ucsdhealthsciences:



Smokers Who Use E-Cigarettes Less Likely to Quit

Study rebuts contention that devices assist tobacco cessation


The rapid increase in use of e-cigarettes has led to heated debates between opponents who question the safety of these devices and proponents who claim the battery-operated products are a useful cessation tool. A study, published online on April 16 in the American Journal of Public Health, suggests proponents are in error.


University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that smokers who used e-cigarettes were 49 percent less likely to decrease cigarette use and 59 percent less likely to quit smoking compared to smokers who never used e-cigarettes. The population-based study followed 1,000 California smokers over the course of one year.


“Based on the idea that smokers use e-cigarettes to quit smoking, we hypothesized that smokers who used these products would be more successful in quitting,” said Wael Al-Delaimy, MD, PhD, professor and chief of the Division of Global Public Health in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health. “But the research revealed the contrary. We need further studies to answer why they cannot quit. One hypothesis is that smokers are receiving an increase in nicotine dose by using e-cigarettes.”


Although e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco, users, known colloquially as “vapers,” exhale a mixture of volatile organic compounds, heavy metals and ultrafine particles that usually contain aerosolized nicotine in a cloud of vapor.


The findings show that daily smokers and women were more likely to have tried e-cigarettes. Al-Delaimy believes the study will inform the United States Food and Drug Administration and other regulators on the profile of e-cigarette usage among smokers as they create guidelines for e-cigarettes amid continued discussion about product safety and its attraction to people who have never used traditional cigarettes.


In January, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) released the State Health Officer’s Report on E-Cigarettes, a health advisory that addressed the health risks posed by the marketing, sale and use of e-cigarettes.


“There is a lot of misinformation about e-cigarettes,” said CDPH director and state health officer, Ron Chapman, MD, MPH. “That is why, as the state’s health officer, I am advising Californians to avoid the use of e-cigarettes and keep them away from children of all ages.”



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