10 março 2015

Aurora over Icelandic Glacier



Several key conditions came together to create this award-winning shot. These included a dark night, few clouds, an epic auroral display, and a body of water that was both calm enough and unfrozen enough to show reflected stars. The featured skyscape of activity and serenity appeared over Iceland's Vatnajökull Glacier a year ago January, with the Jökulsárlón Iceberg Lagoon captured in the foreground. Aurora filled skies continue to be common near Earth's poles as our Sun, near Solar Maximum, continues to expel energetic clouds of plasma into the Solar System.



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"Spies gonna spy."

“Spies gonna spy.”



- Steven Bellovin, former chief technologist for the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, in response to revelations that researchers with the CIA worked on breaking the security of Apple iPhones and iPads for years. Bellovin is now a professor at Columbia University.

(via officialssay)
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March 10th 1876: First telephone conversationOn this day in 1876...



Bell's diary entry for March 10th where he records the words he said to Watson (bottom of first page) SOURCE: http://ift.tt/1oxzM78





Alexander Graham Bell (1847 - 1922)





Thomas Watson (1854 - 1934)



March 10th 1876: First telephone conversation


On this day in 1876 the first telephone conversation took place between Alexander Graham Bell and his lab assistant Thomas Watson. Bell had recently secured the patent for his new invention - the telephone - and three days later succeeded in making a call. He summoned Watson from the next room thus making the first, albeit very brief, telephone call. Controversy surrounds the invention of the telephone, as there have been claims that the credit for the invention in fact rests with another inventor: Elisha Gray. Gray had also been working on a device for transmitting voice messages and both filed the patent the same day, leading to speculations about who got there first. However, whether erroneously or not, Bell is the one credited for the invention of the telephone, and he and Watson share the fame as the people who made the first telephone call.



"I then shouted into M [the mouthpiece] the following sentence: "Mr. Watson, come here — I want to see you." To my delight he came and declared that he had heard and understood what I said”

- Bell’s diary entry from March 10th 1876



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daily-biology:The Capybara, a large rodent native to South...





daily-biology:



The Capybara, a large rodent native to South America, is capable of running as fast as a horse



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A queen’s pet gazelle, mummified and buried with its...





A queen’s pet gazelle, mummified and buried with its owner. 945 BCE, Twenty-First Dynasty, Egypt


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TAROT DO AMOR – SOBRE VOCÊ A JUSTIÇA

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(From CDC)





(From CDC)


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Preparing to Test the Booster for NASA's New Rocket



Engineers at Orbital ATK prepare to test the largest, most powerful booster ever built for NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), which will fire up for a ground test at 11:30 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, March 11, at Orbital ATK Propulsion Systems’ test facilities in Promontory, Utah. The two-minute static test is a significant milestone for the SLS as part of NASA’s journey to Mars, and follows years of development. It is one of two ground tests to qualify the booster for flight. A second test is planned for early 2016. Once qualification is complete, the hardware will be ready to help send the rocket, along with NASA’s Orion spacecraft, on its first flight test. When completed, two five-segment, solid-rocket boosters and four RS-25 main engines will power the SLS as it begins its deep space missions. The boosters operate in parallel with the main engines for the first two minutes of flight, providing more than 75 percent of the thrust needed for the rocket to escape Earth’s gravitational pull. The first flight test of the SLS will feature a configuration for a 70-metric-ton (77-ton) lift capacity and carry an uncrewed Orion spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit to test the performance of the integrated system. As the SLS is updated, it will provide an unprecedented lift capability of 130 metric tons (143 tons) to enable missions even farther into our solar system. Live coverage of the test on NASA TV begins on Wednesday at 11:00 a.m. EDT. Image Credit: Orbital ATK



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(From CDC)





(From CDC)


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